New Signal Detected From A Galaxy 8,000 Million Light Years Away

The energetic phenomenon known as Rapid Radio Bursts (FRBs) was first captured in 2007. Since then, about a hundred repetitions have been detected becoming one of the most mysterious and powerful space events in the Universe, to the point that at the moment the real cause of these strange signs is unknown: are they aliens, black holes, star bursts or something else? Whatever it is, for the second time in a week, it has become known that it has been possible to find the origin of the area of ​​the galaxy from where these electromagnetic radiations arrive that barely last a few milliseconds. So despite not knowing the cause, at least we already know from where they arrive.

The gust we talked about was detected on May 23, but we know the information now. It has been given the name FRB 190523 and was captured by the Owens Vallet Radio Observatory (OVRO) of the California Institute of Technology about 7.9 billion light years in a distant galaxy very similar to ours, both in terms of size and age. This implies that our own Milky Way would be able to generate these types of emissions outside our environment, something that clashes with previous beliefs.

Another one of the peculiarities of this new signal that has been captured is that it is unique, there is no repetition as reported in 2014 (FRB 121102) where it was detected, and therefore it is more difficult to track or study. The challenge becomes greater and it is necessary to use a special radio telescope, such as the one used in OVRO. The so-called Deep Synoptic Array-10 (DSA-10) was able to find that signal, generate data and compare it with those obtained by the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. In the future it is expected to increase 100 new dishes to the current 10, which will allow the current matrix to be able to “hunt” more than 100 FRBs in a year.

The new signal joins the one announced last Thursday, FRB 180924, which was generated in a galaxy about 3.6 billion light years away. It is necessary to study both signals carefully and be alert in case they arise more over time.

Tracey Stevens

Tracey is the original creator of thebunsenburner.com and has been a science enthusiast for her whole life. She currently works as a pharmacist and often writes for this website on nights and weekends, researching different studies and reporting on them. She currently resides in Los Angeles.

3990 Providence Lane, Los Angeles CA 90017
Ph: 626-923-1067
tracey@www.thebunsenburner.com
Tracey Stevens

Tracey Stevens

Tracey is the original creator of thebunsenburner.com and has been a science enthusiast for her whole life. She currently works as a pharmacist and often writes for this website on nights and weekends, researching different studies and reporting on them. She currently resides in Los Angeles. 3990 Providence Lane, Los Angeles CA 90017 Ph: 626-923-1067 tracey@www.thebunsenburner.com

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