Should Sperm Donors Lose Their Anonymity?

Should a child born by sperm donation be guaranteed access to their origins? One hundred people conceived through assisted reproduction and 150 personalities have signed in France a letter demanding the end of donor anonymity. “Everyone who wants it should be able to know the identity of their donor,” they say.

The promoters of this forum are the PMAnonyme associations, which bring together people born by donor gametes, and ADFH (Association of homoparental families) and has wanted to mobilize the population before the revision of the bioethics law planned for the coming months. Among the signatories are former ministers Roselyne Bachelot and Dominique Bertinotti, the writer Annie Ernaux, the psychiatrist Serge Hefez, the historian Pierre Rosanvallon or the deputy Jean-Louis Touraine, one of the participants in the debate on the next revision of the law. For the processes already carried out, the signatories request a voluntary registration that allows former donors to transmit their data.

Anonymity is one of the pillars of sperm donation in most countries, but it is weakening due to the rise of DNA tests on the Internet. In France they have already allowed about fifteen people born thanks to a donation to find their donor outside the law, according to PMAnonyme. One of the people who has managed to reach his father thanks to a genetic test is Arthur Kermalvezen, 36, who has published his story in his latest book ‘Le fils’.

Examples From Other Countries

Several countries have already given up the anonymity of sperm donation, including the United Kingdom, Germany or the Scandinavian countries. According to an Ifop survey commissioned by the ADFH association, 75% of French people are in favor of accessing the donor’s identity. The bioethics bill, whose most delicate part is the opening of the donation to lesbian couples and single women, will be presented to the Council of Ministers in July.

In our country, the Assisted Reproduction Law states that “the donation will be anonymous and the confidentiality of donor identity data must be guaranteed.” The text argues that children born are entitled by themselves or their legal representatives to obtain general information from donors that does not include their identity.

Only exceptionally, in extraordinary circumstances that pose a certain danger to the life or health of the child or when appropriate under criminal procedural laws, can identity be revealed, “provided that such disclosure is indispensable to avoid the danger or to obtain the proposed legal purpose, says the law.

Michelle Rogers

Michelle is a research-wiz with over 14 years of experience in scientific writing. She has covered a variety of topics for thebunsenburner.com, writing her own news pieces based on original research and also helping out the rest of our staff. Currently she resides in Texas.

1089Hall Place, Longview TX 75601
Ph: 903-788-4135
michelle@www.thebunsenburner.com
Michelle Rogers

Michelle Rogers

Michelle is a research-wiz with over 14 years of experience in scientific writing. She has covered a variety of topics for thebunsenburner.com, writing her own news pieces based on original research and also helping out the rest of our staff. Currently she resides in Texas. 1089 Hall Place, Longview TX 75601 Ph: 903-788-4135 michelle@www.thebunsenburner.com

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